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News & Events :
 
What is Swine Flu
 
Swine flu is an infection caused by a virus. It's named for a virus that pigs can affect pigs. People usually do not get swine flu, but human infections can and do happen. The virus is contagious and can spread from human to human. Symptoms of swine flu in people are similar to the symptoms of regular human flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.
 
Swine flu also known as swine influenza, hog flu and pig flu. In 2009 the media labeled as "swine flu" the flu caused by 2009's new strain of swine-origin A/H1N1 pandemic virus just as it had earlier dubbed as "avian flu" flu caused by the recent Asian-linage HPAI (High Pathogenic Avian Influenza) H5N1 strain that is still endemic in many wild bird species in several countries.
   
On June 11, 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) signaled that a global pandemic of novel influenza A (H1N1) was underway by raising the worldwide pandemic alert level to Phase 6. This action was a reflection of the spread of the new H1N1 virus, not the severity of illness caused by the virus. At the time, more than 70 countries had reported cases of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection and there were ongoing community level outbreaks of novel H1N1 in multiple parts of the world.
 
What are the Symptoms of Swine Flu
 
As swine flu spreads fast throughout the country, it is important to know the symptoms of the disease so you can recognise it in yourself and others at an early stage.
 
Usually symptoms of swine flu have generally proved mild. However a small number of patients may develop more serious illness.  Many of these people have other underlying health conditions, such as heart or lung disease, that put them at increased risk.
 
 
Typical symptoms are :
 
  • A sudden fever - 100 degrees F or above
  • A sudden cough
 
Other symptoms may include :
 
  • Headaches
  • Tiredness
  • Chills
  • Cough and sneezing
  • Headache
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Aching muscles and joints
  • Sore throat
  • Runny nose
  • Diarrhoea or stomach upset
  • Loss of appetite
 
You must see a doctor immediately if :
 
  • you have a serious existing illness that weakens your immune system, such as cancer
  • you are pregnant
  • you have a sick child under one
  • your condition suddenly gets much worse
  • your condition is still getting worse after seven days (five for a child)
 
High-risk groups
 
For most people, swine flu is a mild illness. Some people get better by staying in bed, drinking plenty of water and taking over-the-counter flu medication.
 
However, some groups of people are more at risk of serious illness if they catch swine flu, and will need to start taking antiviral medication as it is confirmed that they have it.
 
It is already known that you are particularly at risk if you have :
 
  • chronic (long-term) lung disease,
  • chronic heart disease,
  • chronic kidney disease,
  • chronic liver disease,
  • chronic neurological disease (neurological disorders include motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease),
  • immunosuppression (whether caused by disease or treatment) or
  • diabetes mellitus.
 
Also at risk are :
 
  • patients who have had drug treatment for asthma within the past three years,
  • pregnant women,
  • people aged 65 and older, and
  • young children under five.
 
It is vital that people in these higher-risk groups who catch swine flu get antivirals and start taking them as soon as possible.
 
As with any sort of influenza, how bad and how long the symptoms last will depend on treatment and the patient's individual circumstances.
 
Most cases reported in India have been relatively mild, with those affected starting to recover within a week. Persons with swine flu infection should be considered potentially contagious for up to 7 days following illness onset. Persons who continue to be ill longer than 7 days after illness onset should be considered potentially contagious until symptoms have resolved. Children, especially younger children, might potentially be contagious for longer periods.
 
Prevention and Precautions for Swine Flu
 
Flu viruses are spread mainly from person to person through droplets created while coughing or sneezing by a person infected with swine flu. Infected person may be able to infect others beginning one day before symptoms develop and up to seven or more days after becoming sick.
 
Stay away from people who display signs of swine flu. DO NOT TOUCH YOUR MOUTH AND NOSE WITH YOUR HANDS. YOU MAY TOUCH SURFACES ON WHICH A PERSON MAY HAVE EARLIER SNEEZED OR COUGHED. WASH & SANITIZE YOUR HANDS FREQUENTLY.
 
Information on the effectiveness of facemasks and respirators for decreasing the risk of swine fluis extremely limited. Thus, it is difficult to assess their potential effectiveness in decreasing the risk of swine flu (H1N1) virus transmission. In the absence of clear scientific data, the interim recommendations below have been developed on the basis of public health judgment, the historical use of facemasks and respirators in other settings for preventing transmission of influenza and other respiratory viruses.
 
  • You can help prevent the spread of germs that cause respiratory illnesses like influenza by covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Washing your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. You can also use alcohol-based hand cleaners.
  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Trying to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Staying home from work or school if you are sick.
 
The impact of swine flu is becoming more severe everyday. If you suspect you have caught it, it recommended that you stay at home to avoid infecting others. The virus typically spreads from coughs and sneezes or by touching contaminated surfaces and then touching the nose or mouth. Symptoms are similar to those of seasonal flu, and may include fever, sneezes, sore throat, coughs, headache, and muscle or joint pains.
 
Because swine flu is a new virus, most people have no natural immunity.  People older than age 50 are getting swine flu at far lower rates than younger people, which may be an evidence older people may have some immunity from prior exposures to a similar virus.
 
How to Identify Swine Flu?
 
Swine flu Vs Common Cold
 
What are the typical symptoms of Swine Flu and how do you differentiate it from the common cold or the regular flu? The swine flu and the regular flu look identical to most people. Both have similar symptoms such as
 
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Cough
  • Sore Throat
  • Body Aches
 
However in some cases the swine flu may cause more discomfort. Patients could complain of nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea, which are not typical symptoms of Influenza or Flu. People over 65, children under age 8 and anyone with a chronic medical condition are more susceptible to the virus.
 
July 13th Update: 19 New Cases
 
Swine flu cases in India on Monday crossed the 200-mark with 19 more people testing positive for the virus.
 
Following is the break up from various Indian cities
Hyderabad - 8
Delhi - 6
Ahmedabad  - 2
Thiruvanathapuram - 1
Mumbai - 1
Pune - 1
 
July 31st Update: 16 New Cases
 
Sixteen positive cases were reported in India today. The total number of confirmed cases stands at 525 out of which 369 have been cured.
 
Pune 10
Hyderabad 2
Delhi 1
Gurgaon 1
Chandigarh 1
Imphal Manipur 1
 
Out of the ten cases in Pune, nine cases [13/M, 8/M, 9/F, 11/F, 13/M, 9/M, 11/M, 12/F, and 11/F] are contacts of previously reported positive cases. As reported earlier children seem to be more vulnerable to swine flu.
 
August 1st Update:
 
Nine positive cases of Swine Flu are reported in India today. The total number of confirmed cases now stands at 534 out of which 422 have been cured and discharged.
 
Citywise break up
Pune 8
Cochin 1
 
Out of the eight cases in Pune, seven cases [14/F, 12/F, 14/F, 12/M, 13/F, 11/M and 11/M] are contacts of previously reported positive cases. The eighth case is a 3 year old male who travelled from New York Mumbai on 21 July 2009 and further travelled by road on the same day to Pune.
 
The lone case in Cochin is a 24 year old male who is a contact of a previously reported positive case
 
August 31st Update: 106 New Cases. Toll Touches 100
 
One hundred and six new cases of swine flu have been reported today, a significantly low number compared to the past week. The number of deaths however rises to 7 today taking the toll to 100. The total number of infections rises to 3987.
 
Infections
 

Delhi 

12

Karnataka 

11

Tamil Nadu 

15

Maharashtra

48

Kerala

5

Haryana 

2

Goa

1

West Bengal

2

Uttarakhand

1

Mizoram 

1

Rajasthan 

1

Uttar Pradesh 

7


Deaths:
Karnataka 

2

Maharashtra

4

Chattishgarh

1

 
September 1st Update: 114 New Cases, numbers cross 4000
 
One hundred and fourteen new cases of swine flu were reported today. Maharashtra reported the highest number of cases at 48 followed by Karnataka at 22. One death was reported from Goa
 
Breakup by State :
 

State

Infections

Delhi 

10

Karnataka 

22

Tamil Nadu 

6

Maharashtra

48

Haryana 

1

Chandigarh 

2

West Bengal

18

Jammu & Kashmir

1

Puducherry 

2

Chattishgarh

1

Orissa

3

 
The total number of infections in the country now rises to 4101
 
September 13th Update: 160 New Cases. Numbers cross 6000
 
One hundred and sixty new cases of swine flu were reported in India today. This takes the total number of infections to 6050. Nine deaths were reported, taking the death toll to 173
 
Numbers by state
 

State 

Infections

Delhi 

49

Andhra Pradesh 

9

Karnataka 

23

Maharashtra

57

Kerala

4

Haryana 

2

Chandigarh 

1

West Bengal

1

Gujarat 

11

Rajasthan 

1

Uttar Pradesh 

2

 
H1N1 swine flu is not gone; Obama declares a special week for vaccinations, now in ample supply
 
Nearing the end of his first year's reign, President Obama has issued a presidential proclamation declaring this entire week as National Influenza Vaccination Week, inviting all Americans who have not already done so to take a needle in the arm or a dose up the nose. (See full text below.)
 
Polls earlier in the fall, when the vaccine was in short supply, indicated many Americans had no intention of getting the vaccine, amid rumors over lack of testing and fears of unanticipated side effects. Those adverse side effects have not materialized. But neither has a rush for the vaccine, now in ample supply.
 
An uptick in reported cases of H1N1 swine flu the week after Christmas, when millions returned to work, raised concerns about widespread complacency leading to a renewed wave of the sometimes deadly illness this winter.
 
With that concern and an abundance of the vaccine on hand (an estimated 136 million doses now), officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are urging even seniors to get the vaccine. Because of their lifelong exposure to more flu strains, seniors were believed less likely to catch H1N1 and many postponed immunizations when supplies were scarce.
 
"We think it's time now for seniors," said one senior CDC officer. So, apparently, does the president, with his influenza-week proclamation and invitation.
 
 
 
NEWS & EVENTS
 

Swine flu is an infection caused by a virus. It's named for a virus that pigs can affect pigs.

Swine flu cases in India on Monday crossed the 200-mark with 19 more people testing positive for the virus.